Posts Tagged ‘Government High Schools’

SSLC results 2013 – An Analysis

May 14, 2013

Sikshana has just completed its third year of intervention in High Schools. During the first in 10-11, the program was run as a pilot in 34 schools in Kanakapura. In 11-12, it was extended to cover all 105 schools in Ramanagaram District besides Kalghatgi Taluk in Dharwad. With a pass rate of 84.5%, we were able to take RN from the 26th position in the State to 9th among 34 Districts. The year just concluded marks our second effort in bringing about an increased success rate in High Schools.

Planning 

Our goal this year in RN was two fold: to get the pass rate to above 87% and take RN to within the top five among the 34 Districts in the State. The latter is to be viewed against the 26th rank obtained in 2011 and 9th in 2012. As for Kalghatgi the aim was to take the % pass up by at least 1% .

Performance

This year, 5755 students wrote the examination from the four Blocks of RN District and 1056 from Kalghatgi in Dharwad. Of these 4853 ( 84.5%) passed in the former and 985 (94%)  from the latter. While these numbers does not look very different from the figures for the previous year, an analysis shows some significant achievements of the current year that need to be highlighted.

To start, the scores of the five Blocks referred to above differed widely.  Kalghatgi and Channapatna got 94% and Kanakapura 89% ; these are to be viewed against the State Top Score of 88.8 % for a District. Magadi scored 84.5% ; but for the unexpectedly high failure rate in just one school out of the 21 in the Block, the rate would have equalled the above figure here too bringing the success to an amazing four Blocks out of five exceeding the State top score. Ramanagaram Block alone, in comparison, fared badly at 79% bringing down the overall figure to 84.5% from a possible/ planned 87% which would have placed the District well within the top five in the State.

A further analysis of RN block shows that in just five schools out of 26, there was an unanticipated failure of 155 students; had these schools fared as expected, the District score would still have reached 87% placing us at slot 5, as anticipated and planned. Incidentally four of the five schools are in RN town and they were known to have certain socio-economic issues, which gives us interesting clues on what needs to be done during the ensuing year for rectifying this anomaly. Incidentally, had the sixth school in Magadi had also performed as planned, the rank would have gone even above the Fifth slot.

One can sum it up by saying that the processes deployed were good enough to achieve and even exceed the ambitious targets set for the year; and that the overall picture was severely dented by the unexpected non-performance of 3% of the schools located in a single Block.

 Processes

The reference to terms like planned /anticipated pass/ failure rates above are to be viewed in the context of the processes deployed under the program.

At the start of the year, the Mentors surveyed the schools with the help of the teachers and came up with a list of 1750 students in RN who were ‘gravely’ under the risk of failing in the final exams, going by their past performances. It was decided to focus on these students in the 1st Phase till Nov/Dec by which time the syllabus would be completed and the revision tests would commence. The intervention was in two directions: individual and group counseling for those who show overall weakness with a view to increasing their effort levels and provide supplemental coaching to those who had problems with specific  subjects. With these initiatives, the number at risk was brought down to 950 in Dec. These are students who looked like falling under the category of ‘no-hopers’.

During Jan-Mar the Mentors came up with a few innovative measures addressing these students. These included home visits, organized group studies and daily telephonic monitoring at home. The last survey was done during the week ahead of exams and it showed 652 were still at risk. It should be stressed once again here that all figures beyond Dec were not just numbers – they were backed by names in our data base and the followups were on this basis.

A post-result analysis shows that even from these no-hopers, 239 passed which has drawn admiration and unqualified praise from the schools. On the whole 488 students were enabled to pass from a pool which was exclusively one of ‘down and outs’; roughly 850 students were saved from the original weak student list , thanks to our intervention.

 Conclusion

Of the 950 identified weak students in Dec, only 488 failed; 512 were from the category considered relatively safe making up a total of 900. The latter, though a regular annual phenomenon, was somewhat on the higher side this year. A school based analysis shows that 60 schools equalled or exceeded our estimates while 46 fell short. It looks that our ability to predict the impact of the intervention is still very much intact. This will go a long way towards our planning for better results next year.

Advertisements

The Other Side of the Picture – 2

December 11, 2011

(On many issues, we are often fed with one side of the picture that becomes the reality for us for two reasons: anything that is repeated again and again assumes the face of truth over a period of time and in any case we do not ever get to hear the other side of it. This is a series on such contradictions in the Public Education System)

Apples and Oranges

No one who has a few rupees to spare will send his son or daughter will ever send him/her to a Government High School, or would they?  It is one thing to take a risk with Primary schools; the damage can always be undone in the subsequent stage. It is quite different with High Schools and the SSLC examinations, which are pretty serious stuff and one does not afford to take chances any longer. Given the poor image of the Government schools, the data should show that people flock to the Private schools and that the latter fulfill their expectations with commensurate results.

Let us take a look at the picture emerging from the SSLC examinations of last year. Of the 10,800 schools in the State, 1,468 schools scored 100 per cent results. Of these, surprise of surprises, 401 are Government Schools and 108 Govt Aided! It is seen that 959 private unaided schools had also achieved this distinction. The ratio may look a bit skewed towards private schools until you start looking at all the factors in their favor.  Unlike the State run schools, they have the right to be selective in admissions and also have the power to detain non-performing students, both of which they exercise; more crucial is the last year in which many premium schools routinely ‘expel’ those who are most likely to fail and these kids invariably land in Government schools. No wonder the number of private schools scoring a perfect 100 is relatively high. The real surprise comes up at the other end of the spectrum. Forty-four schools recorded zero pass percentage. Of these, four are aided, while another 40 are private schools. There were no Government schools at all in this category!

A detailed analysis of the performance in various brackets shows the following: 

Type Schools >80% 60- 80% 40-60%  <40%
No. % No. % No. % No. %
Govt 3714 1668 45 1162 31 630 17 254 7
Aided 2980 1358 46 900 30 458 15 194 9
Private 4149 2171 52 1042 25 489 12 479 11

One can see that ,except in the 80 plus category where there is a marginal shortfall, the Government schools score over private schools in all others.

That people would prefer to admit their kids in a Private school, which has a zero pass record in preference to a performing Government school in the same vicinity appears strange. It only highlights the fact that perceptions often rule over reality. There is yet another interesting fact that comes up if you take this study further to areas where there are no private schools to contend with and the kids in the area need to enroll only in State run institution. I came across a cluster of this type near Madanapalle in Chithoor District, AP. While the overall performance levels were uniformly high here, I found two schools close to each other, which were producing astounding results. The first had 84 students of which 83 passed; the failed kid had an assignable cause. The average mark scored in this school was 84! The second had 29 and all of them passed; the average score here was an unbelievable 92, the highest being 96! The rub off effect of the talented kids on the rest in the classroom is clearly visible in an environment where segregation of the good from the poor has already not happened through selective induction in parallel streams. An in-depth study, I am sure, will go on to prove the desirability of a Common School System in the quest towards social equity.

Notwithstanding the above, It is true that the best of the Government schools presently do not come anywhere near the best of the Private schools. A comparison between a 95% kid in the former with another with the same score in the latter will show large differences in terms of depth/width of knowledge extending beyond the syllabus content. This proves nothing since the kids in the two segments come from widely differing social strata and have definite advantages and handicaps that go on to define these results. Given the talent, one has to admit that the private stream aspires for and achieves levels of excellence that are beyond the reach of the former. This admission should however not be at the cost of recognizing that the Government schools do an equally good job in providing affordable education of acceptable quality for the masses.

The shrill voices for dismantling the Public Education System are to be viewed in this context. It is a case of apples and oranges; any comparison is odious and we need them both.

E S Ramamurthy

 

A Humbling Experience

December 2, 2011
This publicity leaflet may appear strange to many, especially if one  can read Telugu. This one was brought out by a Sikshana school months back- even I did not know about its existence till yesterday.
It is from the Government (ZP) High school in Mulakalcheruvu ( Madanapalle Cluster), in which GORD and Sikshana worked together during 10-11.  In the SSLC Examinations of ’11,  85 students appeared and all but one passed. Even the failed student scored 60% on the whole but could not get through just one subject – Telugu- since his mother tongue was different. 27 students scored more than 500 out of 600, the highest being 562 (94%).  The biggest surprise of all: the average marks of all the students who appeared for the examination was 84%!
These are extremely impressive figures by any standards – Private schools included- but the one that took the cake was what followed in their presentation. 40 Students migrated from Private schools to this Govt school in 8th Std , 20 in 9th and 10 in 10th at the beginning of the current academic year! That is a real shocker for anyone who still doubts that Government schools can deliver on their promises.
This school was scoring 58% and 64% during the years preceding 08-09 when the current HM- Mr Prabhakar- came into the school initiating the upward swing. Of course the credit goes no less to the dedicated set of teachers who needed only this trigger to show their mettle.
That the school is putting in its best efforts to rope in the community through publicizing the improved performance , which incidentally has resulted in the above reverse  migration, speaks volumes about their determination to break out of the mold and show the better face of the Public Education System.
My next stop yesterday was the ZP school at Pulikallu. Here there were 29 students last year and all of them passed. The average mark here was 92%! There was very little I could ask for in terms of improved performance in the examinations when the scores are this high already. I did suggest to them that they should focus on two things now onwards. The first is the ‘Achilles Heel’ of the entire system, which is the learning level in English. Marks apart, the ability of the students to understand and handle the spoken language continues to be poor. The second was to share their experiences and help the other schools in the cluster to emulate their results. We do need badly ‘leaders’ in the field who can become instruments of change. Maybe we will find some of them in these schools.
It was seen that three out of the seven schools supported by us scored 100% results, something that has never happened in these schools in the past. I came back humbled by the experience; what a pool of talent is lying there waiting to be tapped by someone and how we are still reaching only the fringes with all that we are doing?  This is something that both Vibha and Sikshana should ponder – besides hosts of others who could also chip in.
Ramamurthy

Tapping Student Power

July 10, 2011

 

The performance of a group of students is affected by a number of factors that are routinely acknowledged and put to use by the teachers and Sikshana. During my field visits I found that we have not been realizing the full potential of one of them; it is the influence of one on the other. This is no less in the High Schools than at the primary level.

Setting out to tap this, I had some very interesting experiences. The first came up while trying to tackle the age old bugbear of the PES – attendance or rather the lack of it. During a visit to one of the Upper Primary schools in Anekal where a summer camp was being held, I found that there were 20 kids in the room out of a class of 21. A query on why one is missing when it should be fun attending the camp elicited a range of standard responses – not well , busy at home and gone away on a trip. I sought out the best friend of the missing girl who admitted she was at home and had no real excuse for not being present. I told her: ” if she is really your friend she should be happy playing with you here rather than spend time alone at home; can you go and get her now ? “. She rushed off and was back in minutes with the other girl; even the teacher was surprised at the promptness. I told the entire group that they are responsible for every kid attending the camp daily; after all, it is being organized against a specific promise that they would all be present. Later I checked and found the Group had kept up its promise; the attendance was total right through the remaining days of the camp.

When the schools resumed after the summer break, I started visiting High Schools to check how attendance was faring in the first few days. I knew from prior experience that it would take a couple of weeks before the strength picks up and regular classes commence. This of course is unacceptable in Tenth Standard where every day counts during the year; the best efforts on the part of the teachers however have had little effect till date. The first school I went to had a strength of nearly 100 in Tenth but the attendance was just 20 on the second day. Obviously these are kids who are serious about studies and could be expected to take a lead in bringing about a change. I talked to them for an hour about the effect of such laxity on the part of the missing students on their studies, lives and future career. If the  teachers now take time till Dec or Jan to complete the syllabus leaving little time for revision and tests, they cannot be faulted. I told them in effect: ” it is for you to go and get your friends to come and attend classes, because it is you who will suffer if they do not”.  I asked whether they are willing to take up this challenging task and if yes, how long they will take to get all their missing friends into the class room. To my surprise, they not only accepted it readily but also promised results in three days. I visited three more schools on this trip; the situation in the class room was no different – so too were the responses from the students. To my immense satisfaction, I found that the attendance after the stipulated period was near total in all the four schools. That was my second taste of student power in action.

The first one took place towards the end of last academic year. We were at this time pushing hard towards ensuring that no student fails in the SSLC examinations – a pretty stiff task in most schools. I was there in one of them – Thokasandra- during Jan 11; to my query on the prospects in his school, he categorically affirmed that at least 12 kids would fail in spite of best efforts and nothing can be done about it, since we had only to months left and these kids are way too behind in learning levels. I told him that I would like to talk to them once and see if we could ‘save’ some. The meeting was held under a tree in the school premises.  I found that there were actually 15 kids in the Group waiting for me; possibly the HM did not want to take a chance! I started off by asking them if they knew why have been sent to meet me; prompt came the response that it is possibly because the HM felt that they were all ‘dull’ –  a highly demotivating term used in Public schools which becomes self fulfilling- and would fail in the examinations. When I asked them what they wanted to do about it, there was silence. I told them that they had two options at this point. The first was the easiest – to do nothing and prove that the HM and the teachers were right . The second would be more difficult; they could treat this as a challenge, follow my advice during the remaining days – which would involve considerable additional effort – and go on to prove the prediction to be wrong and they were not ‘dull’ as claimed. The choice was entirely theirs; I gave them ten minutes to discuss this among themselves and get me their response. As I was walking away, I could already hear heated exchanges in the Group.

When I returned, I could see a distinct change in their mood. One of them got up and said that they were willing to do anything to prove their worth; in effect they said: “tell us what we should do and we will do it”. We promptly put them through the standard drill – identify the weak subjects and start writing one model paper a day; this effort which needs 2/3 hours should be over and above their normal workload given in the schools. We organized special coaching sessions and counseling too to hone up their exam skills. The kids put their hearts into it and did a great job. Ultimately, when the results came, it was not a surprise that all except just one had passed ! The same experiment was repeated in Bannikuppe where ten were identified as above; here too all except one passed.  More interesting was a subsequent incident : when Muthuraj , our Mentor for High schools, was passing through one of the villages after the results were announced, two boys came running and told him that they had passed the examinations – and they wanted him to inform me that they had won the challenge!

I wish I had started with more such schools to validate this approach; but whatever data  I could gather was enough to convince me that we need to do a lot more in the area  of  tapping student power. Psychologists do tell us that teens do not always perform well under external compulsions but they do rise to meet a challenge when they face one. Looks elementary isn’t it? It seems to work too.

Student power in the form of group leadership could also make a big difference; but then the teachers seem to get it all wrong here. The practice seems to be to make the student who scores highest marks the leader of the group or a class. Invariably this kid would be such that he or she would rather be left alone to pursue their studies. It is more likely that the one with the leadership qualities is the kid whose scores are modest or even less. It is easy to pick such boys or  girls out in any class; they stand apart from the rest. We need formation of groups around them; the kids in a group do not need to be taught, they need to be managed. It may look like a strange concept; but I am sure it is worth a try.

Maybe, this should  provide the basis for a ‘Nextgen’ initiative under Sikshana.

E S Ramamurthy

The Unsung Hero(ine)s of Kalghatgi

May 23, 2011

It was just a routine visit for me to Kalghatgi to get a feel of the High Schools that we will be covering from June; but it turned out to be an eye opener for me in many respects. The school that I visited was Bammighatti, a remote village in the midst of nowhere far from Hubli. The summer camp was going on for the current IX Std kids.  I asked them about the SSLC results of last year; they said it was 92.80; I was surprised at this high score since the school was a random choice. I asked our Mentor about the strength in this school; I was told heard that 120 kids attended the examinations and 111 had passed. It was extremely unusual for such large schools to score high averages.  I thought that I might have stumbled on an extraordinarily good school by accident or design at the hands of our Mentor. I asked about the average score of the High Schools in the Taluk; it was 89.8, higher than the highest any District has scored in the entire State. The lowest school in this school zone had scored 77%, which was higher than the average in the State. Three of the 15 schools had scored a perfect 100. More surprise was in store for me; the highest individual score in this school was from a girl at 96.20%!! The next two kids had scored 94 and 93 in the general category; not to be outdone, the topper in the SC / ST group had scored 90!!!

I was accustomed to the Bangalore City scene where schools, many from the premium category, were routinely announcing in the media scores of 92 as major achievement with photos of the schools and the students thrown in. Even among the public schools, there was a Press release last week in which the City Corporation had announced with pride that they had got 52% pass rate this year, up from the 40’s; they even mentioned the few toppers who had scored above 85% . I am aware that most of the latter get special attention and support from the State as well as the Voluntary Sector, just because they happen to be located in the City. The difference in the yardsticks adopted for measuring success in these two cases is glaring; it does hurt the kids in places like Kalghatgi.

The issue that I wanted to raise is however not this; if one cares to look at the Kalghatgi scene closely, a powerful fact stares at us in the face. There are only two private schools in the entire Taluk accounting for just 100 kids out of a total of 1800. It means that a far higher percentage of the so- called good kids end up in a Public School in this Taluk, than in any other area. It is obvious that this ‘de- segregation’ in effect has done a world of good to all – the kids, the schools and the community.

The current ‘in-thing’ among the academics and the policy makers is to project choice for the parents as the ultimate solution for all the ills of the Educational Sector. Going against the tide, I would like to make a case for a good Common School System. If implemented properly in ‘letter and spirit’, it could be a far better and more equitable option for the country. Till now, I thought I would have to take examples from other exotic places to prove the point. Kalghatgi has proved that one exists right there in our backyard.

PS: Kalghatgi does not want to rest on its laurels; it wants to join the Sikshana family to take the performance a notch higher. For me, this is even more amazing.

E S Ramamurthy

Amazing success story of Sikshana High schools

May 14, 2011
Flash Results
Sikshana was implemented in 24 of the 34 Government High schools of Kanakapura Taluk. A comparison is given below on the performance of our schools against those in other streams. This shows we are coming out on top on all counts.
Schools with 100 % Pass: Sikshana: 3 (out of 24)/ Private: 3 (out of 17)    (Pl See Note * below). Some of the Government schools have one or two kids with serious issues such as migratory parents (leading to loss of attendance), socio-economic problems and learning disabilities( which qualify them for special schools but invariably rejected by the parents). If these students are accounted for, eight schools should be deemed to have acquired 100% pass rate, a phenomenal success by any standards. .
Schools over 90%: 11 out of 24 under Sikshana outscoring clearly private schools which had only 6 out of 17
Lowest score under Sikshana: 73%/  Private: 59 %. A scatter diagram will show the lead better.

Performance of the schools in different streams:

        Type of Schools
Number
Students
Passed
Failed
% Pass
Pass  Range
Govt Sikshana
24
1166
1015
151
87.5
73.5 – 100
Govt Non-Sikshana
10
784
498
286
63.5
40 – 80.2
Aided
12
1714
1225
489
71.5
54.5 – 86.7
Private
17
838
715
123
85.3
59.6 – 100
 A more detailed study along with the processes deployed follows separately.
Note *
A comparison between Government and private schools should take into account the following:
·         Admission to Govt schools cannot be denied to anyone, while private schools have and use the option of choosing their students. A study of the profiles of the parents under both streams will show a distinct difference, to the advantage of the latter.
·          Students are not detained either at 9th or in 10th from writing the final exams in Govt schools, except of prolonged absence. Private schools use the option of detention/ transfers based on poor academic performance to improve their final scores. In fact, schools under Sikshana routinely take in students at 10th who have been forcibly evicted from private schools with a transfer certificate.

·          It is not possible to enforce in Government schools many of the disciplinary measures routinely adopted in the private ones- for the simple reason that the State is keen and also obliged to keep the kids in school under all circumstances.